Category: Diane’s Favorites

Dark Days Road to Metal
May 22nd, 2018 by diane92345

“It all started with a tooth. A metal tooth that could bring the dead back to life.”

Green Lantern senses an evil presence emanating from the deep recesses of the Batcave. The Joker escapes from his electronic cage. Batman is given a dagger by his ex, Talia, to help him in his search for the elusive 8th metal. Meanwhile, the Joker is playing his tricks. This time he says he is trying to help Batman by destroying a machine. You know you’re in for some bad sh*t when the Greek Gods go back to Olympius and bar the door.

The two Dark Days’ prelude stories, Forge 1 and Casting 1, are the best in this volume. Both the art and story are superb. The other stories vary in quality and relationship to Dark Nights Metal. All are interesting for showing how art and writing styles have changed over the years. Other stories included are:

 

  • Final Crisis 6-7,
  • Batman: Return of Bruce Wayne 1
  • Batman 38-39
  • Nightwing 17
  • Detective Comics 950
  • Multiverse Guidebook 1

If you plan to read Dark Nights: Metal when its collection is released June 12, Dark Days: Road to Metal is a great reminder of its backstory. Plus it’s a great value at 256 pages. The artwork, especially of the Joker and mecha-Batman from the cover, is beautiful and detailed. The dark multiverse plot forcing an epic war is great and continues down the recent dark path of Batman.

Dark Days: Road to Metal is highly recommended. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, DC Comics, and NetGalley for an advanced copy. Now onto my ARC of Dark Nights Metal. I can’t wait! Review to be published on its June 12 publication date.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Fantasy, Graphic Novel Tagged with: , , ,

All the Answers
May 15th, 2018 by diane92345

Families are messed up. Even, maybe especially, famous ones.

The author of All the Answers is Michael Kupperman. He is a famous, Eisner Award-winning artist and writer. However, he continues to be haunted by his father’s aloof attitude toward him throughout his childhood and adolescence. The author believes that his father’s famous background as the longest running quiz kid may have mentally harmed his father from a young age.

Quiz Kids was a radio show during WWII and continued as a television show in the fifties. Joel Kupperman was the youngest quiz kid. He was a math wizard with a professed IQ of 200+. His mother was the stereotypical stage mother. She took him to nightclubs and together they hobnobbed with all the famous stars of the day (Milton Berle, Orson Welles, Rita Hayworth, Jack Benny, etc.).

All the Answers depicts the author’s perception of what happened to his father when suddenly thrust into fame. Unfortunately, his father never wanted to talk about his childhood and now cannot due to dementia. His grandmother’s scrapbooks provide some answers. But much of the book seems based more on speculation rather than fact. However, that is missing the point. The setting is Joel’s childhood but the mystery is how Michael will deal with his own unusual childhood. Will he become aloof with his own son or will he break the family dynamic?

All the Answers has a great plot that veers into many areas. It’s about families, fame’s costs, dementia, and child actor mental abuse. It is an extremely compelling read. I downloaded it and read it in one sitting. The art is fabulous.

I liked it more than Fun Home and could see other fans of that graphic novel also enjoying this one. Highly recommended. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Gallery 13, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Graphic Novel, Non-fiction Tagged with: , ,

Flaxborough Crab
May 12th, 2018 by diane92345

“Something or other is sending half the over-sixties round the twist” in the Flaxborough Crab.

A rash of panty theft, quick grope and runs, and window peeping has befallen Flaxborough. The perps are described as elderly men who scuttle away sideways like a crab. When an esteemed villager is accidentally killed while perpetrating an attack, the police rest easy. But hours later, two more incidents are reported. What is causing the disruption of the usual calmness of Flaxborough life?

This is the sixth book in the Flaxborough Mystery series but it can easily be read as a stand-alone. By using metaphors, the Flaxborough Crab successfully combines naughty details with a totally clean story line that is fine for all ages. Some of the metaphors, especially at the senior picnic using flowers, are laugh-out-loud funny. The mystery is more of a whydunnit than the traditional whodunnit.

The Flaxborough Crab is highly recommended for 20th century police procedural and British cozy mystery fans. It could be likened to a 1950’s precursor of the Stephanie Plum series with the elderly women of the village playing a clean version of Lula. Seriously, this book is funny! 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Farrago Books, and NetGalley for a copy. I can’t wait for the next in the series!

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Mystery & Thrillers Tagged with: , ,

Obscura
May 8th, 2018 by diane92345

Page-turner is so overused that it has become trite.  Here is how I felt about Obscura by Joe Hart. I…COULDN’T…PUT…IT…DOWN!  Literally!  I was reading my kindle at stop lights, during boring parts of a telephone conference call at work (with my office door closed of course) and when I should really be sleeping.  The plot is completely different from what I usually read.  It is a mystery but set in the future that included copious comingled science fiction and science fact.

Humans are increasingly becoming victims of a vicious type of dementia that resembles quick onset Alzheimer’s.  Dr. Gillian Ryan’s husband falls victim to it.  When their daughter also catches it, Dr. Ryan, a neurologist, tries to find a cure using rats. When her funding is cut, she takes a wild gamble on a six-month trip into space to try to find a cure for an even more virulent version of the disease by using human subjects in her trials.

Unfortunately, revealing any more of the plot would be a spoiler. The best part of Obscura are the wild twists in the plot.  What is causing the disease to become more intense in space? Will Dr. Ryan find a cure? What will happen to her daughter?

This book is superb. It is recommended to anyone who wants to read an intriguing rollercoaster ride with a scientific bent and a near future setting. 5 stars!  At the time of this review, this excellent read was available on Kindle Unlimited.  It is definitely worth picking up!

Thanks to the publisher, Thomas & Mercer, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Kindle Unlimited, Mystery & Thrillers, Science Fiction Tagged with: , , ,

Rice Boy
April 7th, 2018 by diane92345

Equal parts Alice in Wonderland and the Lord of the Rings with a pinch of politics and religion plus maybe some leftover LSD from the 60s. Rice Boy is a true quest tale with the survival of the world at its core.

The One Electronic, T-O-E for short, is looking for the true messiah. The past 3,000 years have been filled with one fake after another. If T-O-E stops searching for a messiah, he will die. One day after the latest messiah has died, T-O-E asks Rice Boy to be the next messiah.  All Rice Boy needs to do is meet with the Tree Keeper downstream in the Dorlish Wood. Rice Boy refuses and T-O-E leaves. Soon, Rice Boy decides to go on a quest to the Dorlish Wood. He meets Gerund going the same way on a quest to kill the Bleach Beast.  They decide to journey together. There are two sinister foes, Golgo and Dolly on Rice Boy’s trail.

I love Alice in Wonderland and have read a multitude of remixes and updates of it.  Rice Boy is the best of the bunch.  It has the feeling of Alice in Wonderland (everything is just enough similar and just enough off to give a feeling of discomfort). The art is brightly colored.  The tale is just bizarre enough. The mash-up of religion, politics and fantasy really works to create a deliciously different fairy tale.

While marketed as a young adult title, I would recommend it for anyone who enjoys fantasy and especially those who are bored by the similarity of so many recent plots.  Rice Boy is magnificently unlike everything else.  Plus at 460 pages, it is well worth the price tag.

Thanks to the publisher, Iron Circus Comics, for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Fantasy, Graphic Novel, Teen & Young Adult Tagged with:

Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History
April 4th, 2018 by diane92345

Meticulously researched biography about the world’s most famous conjoined twins.

Chang and Eng were joined by a small tube of skin and shared a liver. Today they would have been separated soon after birth. In the early 1800s, they were purchased from their Chinese/Siamese mother for $500. They were shipped to America in steerage while their owners cruised first-class. The twins were shown around America and briefly England as both racially curiosities and freaks while living as basically property of their owners. Eventually, taking control of their life, they marry American sisters and have 21 children. They also purchase some slaves of their own.

Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History does a great job of setting the scene in early America. It relates politics, demographics and culture of each year as the twins travel around the US. The twins’ story is inspiring. Going from slaves to slave owners while being obviously different from all around them is a testament to their intelligence and work ethic if not their morality. Times were different back then and the author tries to place their decisions within the culture of the times.

I enjoyed Inseparable hugely. It reads like fiction despite being fully developed from contemporaneous sources. This book contains so much history, it would also be a good resource for authors writing historical fiction in the same time period. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Liveright, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Non-fiction Tagged with: ,

Last Equation of Isaac Severy
March 6th, 2018 by diane92345

Complex and completely different from other thrillers, the Last Equation of Isaac Severy is highly recommended.

Isaac Severy is a famous mathematician.  Now retired, he is still working on his last equation: how to use chaos theory to predict Los Angeles traffic.  As the book opens, Isaac is preparing a breakfast for two in his home. The next day Isaac is found dead in his hot tub along with a set of live Christmas lights with a single bulb crushed. His death is accepted as a suicide. At his funeral, his adopted granddaughter, Hazel, opens a cryptic note from Isaac mailed the day before his death. Isaac tells Hazel that he is only the first of three people soon to die.  He commands her to destroy the work he left behind in a mysterious room 137 and deliver his last equation to the elusive John Raspanti. Hazel is advised to not involve other members of the family or the police. Isaac states that he selected Hazel for these tasks because she would be the least likely to be suspected. He says that he cannot do the tasks himself because he is being followed.

Isaac’s note leads Hazel on a merry chase through literature, mathematics and physics. Hazel works with various family members while trying to follow the instructions in Isaac’s puzzling letter.  Neither Hazel nor the reader can identify who is a hero and who is a villain.  This book has a multitude of side plots.   What is the elusive and wealthy P. Boone Lyons after?  Why is a physicist who has been dead for sixty years attempting to contact Hazel?

Ostensibly a thriller, the family dynamics are almost more intriguing. Phillip is a tenured physics professor at CalTech.  However, his opportunities of winning a coveted Nobel prize are slipping away and his best years are behind him. Tom is released from a long prison term.  Why was he in prison and how does that relate to Hazel and Gregory’s fear of his release?

Since the family relationships are rather confusing, I created this handy family tree.

Severy_Family_Tree

Since Isaac’s work is with chaos theory, it follows that the reader truly doesn’t understand what is going on until almost the end of the book. It is reminiscent of the movie Chinatown, where there are a multitude of plot layers that don’t cohere until the end. I like that uncertainty but some may not. However, the resolution definitely is worth the wait.

The Last Equation of Isaac Severy is a brilliant tour-de-force from a debut author.  It is highly recommended to thriller readers.  It would also appeal to fans of quirky family dynamics like those in movie, The Royal Tenenbaums. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Touchstone Books, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Mystery & Thrillers Tagged with: , , ,

Future of Humanity
February 21st, 2018 by diane92345

There are not enough synonyms for fantastic to adequately describe this book. I’ll just stick with awesome and awe-inspiring!

Written in layman’s terms, the Future of Humanity goes from mankind’s move to Mars to its eventual move to a new universe. It discusses what famous science fiction books, television shows and movies got right (surprisingly a lot) and what they got wrong (no fast trips through wormholes or suspended animation in the foreseeable future). The Future of Humanity also contains a brief history of science in tiny easily digestible bites.

The first third of the book talks about what will probably occur by the end of this century. The second part discusses the nut and bolts of how mindless robots, smart artificial intelligence, and nanotechnology will assist the colonization of our universe. It also tells how building a starship could be accomplished (once science solves some mysteries and reduces the price of creating antimatter). The final section discusses long-term travel issues and the changes to Earth and humanity required by the acceleration of the expansion of the universe initially caused by the Big Bang. The pesky problem of extending human life to live long enough to reach a distant planet is described. How humanity may be able to move apart from their physical bodies is investigated. An exploration of the possibilities of extraterrestrials and the string theory of the bubble universe concludes the book.

A enthralling and timely book merging science, pop culture, and intelligent guessing. The Future of Humanity is an intriguing, well-researched look into the future by a beloved scientist. Obviously, the first third is much more likely to occur. As the timeframe lengthens, the odds of prophecy being correct always goes down. However, this is a great peek into mankind’s possible future.

Highly recommended for science-fiction readers and writers. This book contains some great science-based plot ideas. It is also recommended for regular readers who enjoy a great and fact-based story. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Doubleday, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Non-fiction, Science Fiction Tagged with: , , ,

Night Moves
February 20th, 2018 by diane92345

Milo and Alex are back in a twisty and compelling tale.

The body was found in a quiet suburban Pacific Palisades neighborhood with its head disfigured by a shotgun blast and its hands removed. The residents, a family of four, claim to not know the victim. When Milo feels a strange vibe within the family, he calls on clinical psychologist, Alex Delaware, to informally evaluate them. After meeting the overbearing salesman father, the overprotective mother, the athletic son and possibly autistic daughter; Alex agrees that something is simmering just under the surface.

I loved this twisty tale. People that I pinned as the murderer came up dead. Motives were shuffled multiple times as I tried to solve the crimes before Alex and Milo. The ending totally blindsided me though looking back I could clearly see the red herrings and clues that I failed to identify correctly. The last few books in this series have been rather lackluster but Night Moves is one of the best! Highly recommended for series fans and also anyone wanting a good challenging mystery to solve from their armchair. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Ballantine Books, and NetGalley for an advanced copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Mystery & Thrillers Tagged with: ,

Pestilence Vol 1
February 15th, 2018 by diane92345

Roderick is the leader of the Fiat Lux, the fighting arm of the Catholic Church in 1347. The Fiat Luz is tasked with taking the Pope to a safe house in England from his residence in the French countryside.

The world is in the middle of the plague of the Black Death. Eventually 20 million, or 60% of the population of Europe, will perish. Plague victims begin to rise from their graves becoming eaters of the living.

Wow, just wow! The art and especially the lettering of Pestilence Vol 1 perfectly set the mood and evoke the era. I loved the revisionist plot. It is hard to explain why without ruining the wonderful surprises within this excellent comic. Pestilence Vol 1 combines the best of historical fiction, adventure, horror and mystery. It is definitely for adults only and may offend some Christians, especially Catholics. For all others, it is highly recommended. While this is marketed as volume 1, it can be read as a stand-alone story. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Aftershock Comics, and NetGalley for an advance copy. Pestilence Vol 1 will be published February 20, 2018.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Graphic Novel, Horror Tagged with: ,

Smoke City
January 22nd, 2018 by diane92345

Have you ever thought, “Every plot has already been used so what’s the point in reading (or writing) another”? If so, Smoke City is going to surprise you. No book or movie is anywhere near its plot for imagination and creativity.

Smoke City is a captivating genre-smashing novel. Here are the major genres that are colliding like atoms within this novel:

  • Historical fiction (Joan of Arc’s death)
  • Horror (ghost story)
  • Tragedy (predestination during reincarnation)
  • Adventure (adult male bonding during a road trip)
  • Literary fiction (famous artist hits the skids)
  • Magical realism (see above)

It sounds like it would be a huge mess. But somehow it works!

Half-visible wraiths nicknamed smokes are appearing in Southern California and northern Mexico. Mike Vale, a washed up previously famous artist is desperately trying to get to a funeral in Los Angeles.

Mike picks up Marvin Deitz after Marvin is unceremoniously kicked out of his record store’s lease by his shady, possibly mob-connected, landlord. Marvin is convinced that he will die violently before his 57th birthday in a few days. Why? Throughout his multitude of reincarnations, he never lives to 57. Marvin is convinced he is being punished for executing Joan of Arc in 1431. His therapist thinks it is just a delusion. Convinced he has seen the current incarnation of Joan of Arc on a talk show, Marvin is going to Los Angeles in the hopes of finding forgiveness from a woman he has never met–at least in this lifetime.

On the way to LA, the pair pick up a stowaway, Casper. The plot continues to get curiouser and curiouser from there.

Deciding to read this book takes a leap of faith. There is no comparable book or movie to say it resembles. Smoke City was written by a relatively unknown writer and published by a small press. However, take this reviewer’s advice and read this book. It is truly fantastic and totally different from any other book you will read this year! Kirkus Reviews gushed (for them) that it was “strangely satisfying”. It is worth 5+ stars!

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Fantasy, Horror, Literary Fiction, Paranormal Tagged with: , ,

Wife Between Us
January 9th, 2018 by diane92345

The Wife Between Us is the whiplash-inducing thrill ride of 2018!

Nellie is about to marry the man of her dreams, Richard a hedge fund manager in New York City. Vanessa is jealous of her ex-husband Richard’s new fiancée and attempts to stop the wedding. The Wife Between Us starts as a classic triangle with alternating chapters narrated by the two women. In this simple shell hide many secrets and mysteries. What caused Vanessa’s marriage to crumble so abruptly? What happened to Nellie in college in Florida that makes her so fearful? Is Vanessa inheriting her mother’s mental illness possibly making her an unreliable narrator (like Girl on a Train)? Is Richard’s seemingly perfect personality just a facade (like American Psycho)? There are many clues to the plot twists to come hidden in plain sight for observant readers to find.

Many books have been called the next Gone Girl but this book gets this reviewer’s vote.  Both a psychological thriller and a mystery, The Wife Between Us is highly recommended as the best twisty pulse-pounding thrill ride of 2018. Beware that sleep will be lost as the book propels the reader to finish it in one sitting! 5 stars!

Thanks so much to the publisher, St Martin’s Press, and NetGalley for an advanced review copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Mystery & Thrillers Tagged with: , ,

Hundred Small Lessons
December 20th, 2017 by diane92345

A Hundred Small Lessons is a haunting discourse about life wrapped around two families’ stories within a single house.

Elsie and Clem buy a newly built house soon after World War II is over. They have eight-year-old twins and Elsie finds the reason for her existence in motherhood. Sixty-one years later, the twins are almost seventy themselves and Clem is dead. After a bad fall at home, Elsie is shuttled quickly into a nursing home and the house is sold to a new family.

Lucy and Ben are just starting out with their young son. After finding the former owner’s overlooked family photos, Lucy begins to imagine Elsie’s life within the house.

A Hundred Small Lessons alternates between Elsie’s and Lucy’s stories. The language is languorous practically poetic. It feels as if the reader is dreaming, rather than reading, the story. The setting of Brisbane Australia, with its unbridled nature encroaching into everyone’s attempt at order, is a perfect and subtle metaphor for how life can never be controlled.

The holidays and the start of a new year are the time for reflection about the meaning of life and our place within it. Elsie and Clem’s life juxtaposed with Lucy and Ben’s depict one such meaning. Sometimes a book’s plot is just a starting point for thinking about one’s own life. While there is melancholia here, there is also something rather sweet about how life moves through its cycle regardless of our petty triumphs and struggles. As Clem so eloquently says,

All these moments, he thought as the boat edged away from the riverbank. They added up to something, but he could never quite see to what.

A Hundred Small Things is a book to slowly savor. Its evocative setting and thought-provoking plot are perfect starting points for deeper self-reflection. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Atria Books, for sponsoring the Goodreads giveaway that gave me this wonderful book.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Literary Fiction Tagged with: ,

Stay Fit for Life
November 7th, 2017 by diane92345

Stay Fit for Life provides quick workouts for older, rehabbing or sedentary adults with little additional equipment required.

With 62 exercises, 20 workout routines, and three levels of fitness programs, Stay Fit for Life covers all aspects of older adult fitness. There are modifications for most to make them easier or more difficult.  Many of the exercises also include a seated option. The pictures clearly show how to correctly perform all the exercises. Best of all the only equipment needed are a set of dumbbells, floor mat, chair and stair step. Most exercises don’t require anything more than some effort.  Each exercise states which of five abilities it will help the user to achieve.  The abilities include improved posture, greater strength, increased stability, better mobility, and more endurance. Many exercises hit more than one of the abilities.

The introduction of Stay Fit for Life includes some motivational facts such as every minute spent exercising after age 39 increases live span by 7 minutes and some frightening ones such as US emergency rooms treat an older adult for a fall every 11 seconds. There is even a quick six exercise self-assessment test to determine the reader’s fitness level prior to beginning a fitness program. The fitness programs each include four weeks of exercise routines with two days of rest each week. Day 1 of the beginner’s program only takes 12.5 minutes so it is hard to use lack of time as an excuse not to start exercising.

Stay Fit for Life is so great that I have already pre-ordered a hardcopy from Amazon. It is highly recommended for anyone who hasn’t exercised in years and wants a cheap, quick and easy way to start. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, DK, and Netgalley for an advanced review copy.  Stay Fit for Life will be published on November 14, 2017.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Non-fiction Tagged with: , ,

The Real McCoys
November 6th, 2017 by diane92345

The Real McCoys is a cute humorous mystery for middle grade readers with perfect artwork.

Move over Encyclopedia Brown, Moxie McCoy is the new detective in town! Moxie is in fourth grade at Tiddlywhump Elementary School. She is also the sole remaining partner at M&M Inc. detective agency. Her partner, and best friend, Maude moved to California at the worst possible moment. Tiddlywhump’s mascot, Eddie the wise, and stuffed, owl is missing and only a great detective like Moxie can solve the crime. Moxie, who prefers to be called Slim when working a case, narrows down the list of suspects using the wisdom of Annabelle Adams. Annabelle is the star of 58 mystery books that Moxie has read 37 and a half times. Annabelle is obviously the long-lost cousin of Nancy Drew as she uses her wits and luck to get out of incredibly intricate situations. Moxie is also looking for a new detective partner and best friend before winter recess starts the following day.

The illustrations in The Real McCoys are excellent. They are used to perfection to move the plot forward. Many adult mysteries would be improved with illustrations like these. Moxie and the other residents of the school are believable while also being funny. Does Principal Jones really have an eel pit in her closet where she dangles errant students? Does Moxie’s teacher, Mrs. Bunyan, have a weird fascination with teeth? While solving the mystery, many moral lessons are slipped in like don’t jump to conclusions and don’t be embarrassed to ask for help when it’s needed. The mystery is handled well with many twists and turns in the plot. The resolution is both unexpected and perfect. Overall, this humorous mystery is perfect for ages 8 to 12. 5 stars!

I received The Real McCoys in a Goodreads giveaway but that has not impacted my review.

Posted in Children, Diane's Favorites Tagged with: , , ,

Kill Creek
October 31st, 2017 by diane92345

Beware, you may not sleep well after reading Kill Creek!

Kill Creek begins with four horror novelists agreeing to a live-streamed interview in a long abandoned haunted house in Kill Creek, Kansas.  The interviews are held on Halloween night and the novelists stay overnight within the house. All the novelists have different styles from a Stephen King-type horror veteran to a R.L. Stine-type Young Adult horror novelist. To say much more about the plot would spoil it. However, the aftermath of the interview is the best part of this excellent book.

Kill Creek is definitely not for the faint-of-heart.  There is a lot of violence.  However, the story is very innovative. It is clear that the author has a love of all things horror.  There is even a section that echoes a scene in the movie, Murder by Death.  The book is both intelligent atmospheric horror and plain scary. Think of the first Saw movie. I finished reading Kill Creek at night on my Kindle with all the lights off and no one else awake in the house.  I couldn’t fall asleep until dawn! However, I also just couldn’t stop reading! I love the insertion of a mystery within the horror genre.  Kill Creek is highly recommended. 5 stars!

Thanks to the publisher, Inkshares, and NetGalley for an advanced review copy.

Posted in Diane's Favorites, Horror, Mystery & Thrillers, Paranormal Tagged with: ,